AQUASHIELD MI SHIELD EQUIPMENT TREATMENT

LONG LASTING PROTECTION FOR HOCKEY EQUIPMENT SUSCEPTIBLE TO MICRO-ORGANISM GROWTH

 

AQUASHIELD MI SHIELD EQUIPMENT TREATMENT

LONG LASTING PROTECTION FOR SURFACES SUSCEPTIBLE TO MICRO-ORGANISM GROWTH

 

AQUASHIELD MI SHIELD EQUIPMENT TREATMENT

LONG LASTING PROTECTION FOR SURFACES SUSCEPTIBLE TO MICRO-ORGANISM GROWTH

 

AQUASHIELD MI SHIELD EQUIPMENT TREATMENT

LONG LASTING PROTECTION FOR SURFACES SUSCEPTIBLE TO MICRO-ORGANISM GROWTH

 

The stench of smelly sports equipment is finally over.

WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING

AquaShield’s Total Defense for sports equipment solves the issue associated with sports equipment being a breading ground of microorganisms and bacteria. Regular cleaning of equipment using unique cleaning solutions like Ozone is an important step in the fight of removing harmful bacteria from equipment, but its only one step and using Mi Shield provides the extra level of protection needed in between cleanings and in fact reduces the number of cleanings needed in a given period.

Total Defense keeps equipment odor free longer and helps keep equipment looking and feeling new for longer.

EASY TO APPLY
Apply by simply spraying onto the surface and let dry. No machines, no heaters, and no mixing.

Benefits

  • EPA Registered
  • Odorless and colorless
  • Non-toxic
  • Water based
  • Long term prevention of a wide range of microbial growth
  • Protects a wide range of surfaces both porous and non-porous
  • Can be wiped, sprayed or misted on virtually any surface and dries rapidly
  • Non-leaching
  • No off-gasing
  • High Coverage Rates

USED ON

  • Sports Bags
  • Helmets of all kinds
  • Artificial Turf
  • Pads of all kinds
  • Shoes of all kinds
  • Skates
  • Cleats

MRSA BACTERIA LINKED TO SPORTS EQUIPMENT


Scanning electron microscope image showing clumps of MRSA bacteria
Photo courtesy of CDC and Janice Haney Car and Jeff Hageman, M.H.S

Participating in team sports is both fun and healthy exercise, but a bacterial MRSA infection among players can signal a losing season. Now, new research traces one potential path of MRSA bacteria through an endless loop from athletes’ hands to the ball, to the floor of the court, and back to athletes’ hands. The study provides an eye-opening view of an insidious route of exposure to a potentially dangerous pathogen.

What is MRSA?
MRSA is an acronym for “Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus” bacteria. The name reveals that this variety of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria is resistant to the antibiotic drug methicillin and several other related antibiotics.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MRSA is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections in the United States and an important cause of serious infections in the community. There is a growing awareness that “community-associated MRSA” is a particular risk to athletes.

Aggressive, difficult to treat, and sometimes fatal, MRSA has earned its “superbug” status. CDC notes that MRSA usually spreads by direct contact with an infected wound or contaminated hands. Covering infections can help reduce the likelihood of spreading MRSA, but infected individuals can spread MRSA to others without having any symptoms of infection.

Beyond protecting the person by covering infected wounds and hands, surface disinfection of the environment is also very helpful in preventing the spread of MRSA. This is a distinct strategy and surface disinfection is not applied to skin infections but, for example, to sports equipment.

What Researchers Found
Pennsylvania physician Dr. Brandon Haghverdian and his colleagues investigated the level of Staphylococcus aureus contamination on basketballs and volleyballs in a California university gym. They explored whether a ball in play could act as a carrier of the bacteria during sporting events. Using a smart experimental design in which one of each of three surfaces (hands, ball and floor) was specifically disinfected in progressive trials, the researchers confirmed that bacteria are transmitted from each surface to the other two during play. Additionally, bacterial levels on balls in storage decline while not in use, but residual bacterial levels remain viable for 72 hours. The researchers conclude: “Frequent disinfection of sports balls, and intermittent removal of balls from use for at least 24 hr, might reduce the incidence of infectious outbreaks in athletic teams.”

We commend Dr. Haghverdian and his colleagues for raising awareness of a dynamic route of MRSA transmission during sports, and we urge athletic facility staff to respond with appropriate disinfection protocols to help avoid MRSA infection.

Joan B. Rose, Ph.D., is the Homer Nowlin Chair in Water Research at Michigan State University, the editor of the Global Water Pathogen Project, and a member of the Water Quality & Health Council.

NO ALCOHOL REFILLABLE HAND SANITIZER

LASTS UP TO 8 HRS-EASY TO CARRY

NO ALCOHOL REFILLABLE HAND SANITIZER
LASTS UP TO 8 HRS-EASY TO CARRY

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